Human

Nanowire Resting on a Human Hair

Nanowire Resting on a Human Hair
This scanning electron microscope image shows the relative thickness of typical nanowire in comparison with a strand of human hair.

Minimum credit: 

Eric Majur, Harvard University

Size: 

The hair is about 100 µm in diameter; the nanowire's diameter is about 100 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

800

Pixels: Height: 

530

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Human Hair

Human Hair
This is a scanning electron microscope image of a single strand of human hair.

Minimum credit: 

Bryan Bandli, Scanning Electron Microscopy Laboratory, University of Minnesota

Size: 

The diameter of a human hair ranges from about 50 µm to 100 µm.

Pixels: Width: 

1280

Pixels: Height: 

960

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Human Venule

Human Venule
This is an optical microscope image of a human venule—a tiny blood vessel. A venule is tiny blood vessel that connects capillaries—where the blood exchanges the oxygen it carries for carbon dioxide—to larger veins leading back to the heart.

Minimum credit: 

Roger Wagner, University of Delaware

Size: 

A venule is about 30 µm in diameter.

Pixels: Width: 

713

Pixels: Height: 

486

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Human Red Blood Cells (SEM)

Human Red Blood Cells (SEM)
Red blood cells carry a protein called hemoglobin which has a molecular structure adapted to transport oxygen to body tissues. This scanning electron micrograph shows the cells' characteristic donut-like shapes.

Minimum credit: 

Janice Carr, CDC

This is a NISE Network product: 

no

Size: 

The typical diameter of a human red blood cell is 6-8 µm.

Pixels: Width: 

540

Pixels: Height: 

366

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Human Red Blood Cells (optical microscope)

Human Red Blood Cells (optical microscope)
Red blood cells carry a protein called hemoglobin which has a molecular structure adapted to transport oxygen to body tissues. The cells' flexibility allows them to flow through tiny capillaries.

Minimum credit: 

Kristina Yu, Exploratorium

Size: 

The typical diameter of a human red blood cell is 6-8 µm.

Pixels: Width: 

2560

Pixels: Height: 

1920

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

Return to gallery