Medicine

Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Yarn

Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Yarn
This scanning electron microscope image shows nanotube yarn fibers drawn from a "nanotube forest." Nanometer and micron-sized yarn or fibers drawn from multiwalled carbon nanotubes can have tensile strengths comparable to or exceeding those of spider silk. Replacing metal wires in electronic textiles with these nanotube yarns could lead to important new functionalities, such as the ability to actuate (as an artificial muscle) and to store energy (as a fiber super-capacitor or battery).

Minimum credit: 

Mei Zhang, UTD

Size: 

The yarn's diameter is about 1 µm. The nanotubes from which it is being drawn are each about 10 nm in diameter.

Pixels: Width: 

1017

Pixels: Height: 

713

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Electrospun Scaffold

Electrospun Scaffold
This scanning electron microscope image shows an electrospun scaffold grown for studying brain tissue engineering and nerve regeneration. Scaffolds are of great interest in tissue engineering and nerve regeneration because they form a framework on which soft tissue is supported and thereby start its regeneration process. Electrospinning is a versatile process that creates nanofibers by applying a high voltage to electrically charge a liquid. Researchers can tailor a scaffold to meet the requirements of the tissue they seek to regenerate.

Minimum credit: 

David Nisbet, Monash University

Size: 

The image displayed is about 70 µm wide.

Pixels: Width: 

978

Pixels: Height: 

688

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Zinc Oxide Nanowires

Zinc Oxide Nanowires
This is a scanning electron microscope image of vertical arrays of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires on a sapphire substrate. Zinc oxide (ZnO) is an ideal material for nanoscale optoelectronics, electronics, and biotechnology applications. Numerous ZnO-based devices have already been developed, including nanowire field effect transistors, piezoelectric nanogenerators, optically pumped nanolasers, and biosensors.

Minimum credit: 

Shadi Dayeh, University of California at San Diego

Size: 

The sample displayed in the image is about 10 µm wide.

Pixels: Width: 

1102

Pixels: Height: 

965

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Hydrogel Scaffold

Hydrogel Scaffold
This scanning electron microscope image shows a hydrogel scaffold grown for studying brain tissue engineering and nerve regeneration. Hydrogels are polymers of great interest to researchers studying tissue engineering and nerve regeneration because they are compatible with a range of biological tissues and processes, they have mechanical properties similar to those of soft tissues, and they can be injected into tissues in liquid form. In addition, they allow living cells to assemble spontaneously on the scaffold structure.

Minimum credit: 

David Nisbet, Monash University

Size: 

The image is 100 µm wide.

Pixels: Width: 

980

Pixels: Height: 

685

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Silicon Nano-Biosensor

Silicon Nano-Biosensor
This scanning electron micrograph depicts the functional part of a nano-biosensor containing silicon nanowires. Field effect transistors are best known for their key role in computer microprocessors, but their compatibility with various microfabrication strategies has also led researchers to study them for biosensing applications. For example, glucose biosensors may lead to important innovations in the management of diabetes. The lithographic manufacturing processes involved in their production may mean that such sensors can be produced in quantity and scaled for different applications.

Minimum credit: 

Raj Mohanty, Boston University

Size: 

Each nanowire has a diameter of 50 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

833

Pixels: Height: 

709

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Gold Nanoshells (SEM)

Gold Nanoshells (SEM)
To create this scanning electron microscope image, gold nanoshells were dispersed in a drop of water which then dried on a glass microscope slide. The colors are due to selective scattering of light by nanoscale particles. Gold Nanoshells have a variety of uses in nanotechnology, and especially in biomedical applications. Nanoshells like these may play important roles in new kinds of cancer treatments, disease detection, and imaging techniques.

Minimum credit: 

Gary Koenig, University of Wisconsin-Madison

This is a NISE Network product: 

no

Size: 

These gold nanoshells are each about 120 nm in diameter.

Pixels: Width: 

1024

Pixels: Height: 

768

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Gold Nanoshells (optical microscope)

Gold Nanoshells (optical microscope)
To create this optical microscope image, gold nanoshells were dispersed in a drop of water which then dried on a glass microscope slide. The colors are due to selective scattering of light by nanoscale particles. Gold Nanoshells have a variety of uses in nanotechnology, and especially in biomedical applications. Nanoshells like these may play important roles in new kinds of cancer treatments, disease detection, and imaging techniques.

Minimum credit: 

Gary Koenig, University of Wisconsin-Madison

This is a NISE Network product: 

no

Size: 

These gold nanoshells are each about 120 nm in diameter.

Pixels: Width: 

2998

Pixels: Height: 

2398

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Nanotubes Mimicking Gecko Feet

Nanotubes Mimicking Gecko Feet
The nanoscale structures on a gecko's foot enable it to cling to most surfaces. This scanning electron microscope image shows multiwalled carbon nanotubes attached to a polymer backing, an experiment designed to replicate the gecko foot's adhesive properties. The gecko's amazing ability to cling to vertical or inverted surfaces is due to the interaction between nanoscale structures on its feet and tiny crevices on the wall or ceiling. The soles of gecko feet are made up of overlapping adhesive lamellae covered with millions of superfine hairs, or setae, each of which branches out at the end into hundreds of spatula-shaped structures. These flexible pads—each measuring only a few nanometers across—curve to fit inside unseen cracks and divots on the surface. The combined adhesion of these millions of pads holds the gecko in place.

Minimum credit: 

Ali Dhinojwala, University of Akron

This is a NISE Network product: 

no

Size: 

Each bundle of carbon nanotubes measures about 70-80 µm in width.

Pixels: Width: 

1181

Pixels: Height: 

1181

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Gecko Foot (8700X)

Gecko Foot (8700X)
The gecko's amazing ability to cling to vertical or inverted surfaces is due to the interaction between nanoscale structures on its feet and tiny crevices on the wall or ceiling. The soles of gecko feet are made up of overlapping adhesive lamellae covered with millions of superfine hairs, or setae, each of which branches out at the end into hundreds of spatula-shaped structures. These flexible pads—each measuring only a few nanometers across—curve to fit inside unseen cracks and divots on the surface. The combined adhesion of these millions of pads holds the gecko in place. This striking property is being studied for use in the creation of new kinds of adhesive tapes, self-dissolving bandages, and high friction materials that can support loads on smooth surfaces.

Minimum credit: 

Cliff Mathisen, FEI Company

Pixels: Width: 

493

Pixels: Height: 

522

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Gecko Foot (1660X)

Gecko Foot (1660X)
The gecko's amazing ability to cling to vertical or inverted surfaces is due to the interaction between nanoscale structures on its feet and tiny crevices on the wall or ceiling. The soles of gecko feet are made up of overlapping adhesive lamellae covered with millions of superfine hairs, or setae, each of which branches out at the end into hundreds of spatula-shaped structures. These flexible pads—each measuring only a few nanometers across—curve to fit inside unseen cracks and divots on the surface. The combined adhesion of these millions of pads holds the gecko in place. This striking property is being studied for use in the creation of new kinds of adhesive tapes, self-dissolving bandages, and high friction materials that can support loads on smooth surfaces.

Minimum credit: 

Cliff Mathisen, FEI Company

Pixels: Width: 

379

Pixels: Height: 

401

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

Return to gallery