Optical

Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Yarn

Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Yarn
This scanning electron microscope image shows nanotube yarn fibers drawn from a "nanotube forest." Nanometer and micron-sized yarn or fibers drawn from multiwalled carbon nanotubes can have tensile strengths comparable to or exceeding those of spider silk. Replacing metal wires in electronic textiles with these nanotube yarns could lead to important new functionalities, such as the ability to actuate (as an artificial muscle) and to store energy (as a fiber super-capacitor or battery).

Minimum credit: 

Mei Zhang, UTD

Size: 

The yarn's diameter is about 1 µm. The nanotubes from which it is being drawn are each about 10 nm in diameter.

Pixels: Width: 

1017

Pixels: Height: 

713

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Zinc Oxide Nanowires

Zinc Oxide Nanowires
This is a scanning electron microscope image of vertical arrays of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires on a sapphire substrate. Zinc oxide (ZnO) is an ideal material for nanoscale optoelectronics, electronics, and biotechnology applications. Numerous ZnO-based devices have already been developed, including nanowire field effect transistors, piezoelectric nanogenerators, optically pumped nanolasers, and biosensors.

Minimum credit: 

Shadi Dayeh, University of California at San Diego

Size: 

The sample displayed in the image is about 10 µm wide.

Pixels: Width: 

1102

Pixels: Height: 

965

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Zinc Oxide Nanowire Photodetector

Zinc Oxide Nanowire Photodetector
This scanning electron microscope image shows a zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowire photodetector device grown by photolithography. Nanowires geometry and structure make them both sensitive to light and efficient low-noise signaling devices, so they are ideally suited for applications involving light—such as detection, imaging, information storage, and intrachip optical communications. In addition, different types of nanowires can be combined to create devices sensitive to different wavelengths of light. Zinc oxide's (ZnO) electrical, optoelectronic, and photochemical properties have led to its use in solar cells, transparent electrodes, and blue/UV light-emitting devices.

Minimum credit: 

Cesare Soci, University of California at San Diego

Size: 

The separation between the "fingers" is 2 µm.

Pixels: Width: 

645

Pixels: Height: 

484

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Nanowire Photodetector

Nanowire Photodetector
This scanning electron micrograph shows a gallium nitride nanowire photodetector device with a zinc oxide core grown by e-beam lithography. The geometry and structure of nanowires make them both sensitive to light and efficient low-noise signaling devices, so they are ideally suited for applications involving light—such as detection, imaging, information storage, and intrachip optical communications. In addition, different types of nanowires can be combined to create devices sensitive to different wavelengths of light.

Minimum credit: 

Dr. Xinyu Bao, University of California at San Diego

This is a NISE Network product: 

no

Size: 

The nanowire has a diameter of about 200 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

646

Pixels: Height: 

484

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Organic Light-Emitting Diode

Organic Light-Emitting Diode
This is a photograph of an organic light-emitting diode (OLED). OLEDs are being used in the newest generation of television screens. An OLED is comprised of a thin organic film held between conductors. When electrical current is applied to the conductors, the film emits a bright light. Because OLEDs emit light, OLED-based displays do not require backlighting. That's why these displays are both thinner and more efficient than today’s common LCD screens, which require an additional internal light source. Several major electronics companies have recently introduced OLED-based television screens.

Minimum credit: 

Raquell Ovilla, University of Texas at Dallas

Size: 

These organic films are about 200 nm thick.

Pixels: Width: 

405

Pixels: Height: 

423

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Silicon Nanowire Array

Silicon Nanowire Array
This is a scanning electron microscope image of a silicon nanowire array synthesized for thermoelectric applications. Thermoelectric materials convert heat to electricity and vice versa. Most fossil-fuel-powered engines generate waste heat, so researchers are using nanotechnologies to explore ways of making thermoelectric devices more efficient in order to convert that waste heat to usable power—and thus save energy.

Minimum credit: 

Renkun Chen, University of California at Berkeley

Size: 

Each nanowire is approximately 100 nm in diameter.

Pixels: Width: 

1233

Pixels: Height: 

1233

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Gold Nanoshells (SEM)

Gold Nanoshells (SEM)
To create this scanning electron microscope image, gold nanoshells were dispersed in a drop of water which then dried on a glass microscope slide. The colors are due to selective scattering of light by nanoscale particles. Gold Nanoshells have a variety of uses in nanotechnology, and especially in biomedical applications. Nanoshells like these may play important roles in new kinds of cancer treatments, disease detection, and imaging techniques.

Minimum credit: 

Gary Koenig, University of Wisconsin-Madison

This is a NISE Network product: 

no

Size: 

These gold nanoshells are each about 120 nm in diameter.

Pixels: Width: 

1024

Pixels: Height: 

768

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Gold Nanoshells (optical microscope)

Gold Nanoshells (optical microscope)
To create this optical microscope image, gold nanoshells were dispersed in a drop of water which then dried on a glass microscope slide. The colors are due to selective scattering of light by nanoscale particles. Gold Nanoshells have a variety of uses in nanotechnology, and especially in biomedical applications. Nanoshells like these may play important roles in new kinds of cancer treatments, disease detection, and imaging techniques.

Minimum credit: 

Gary Koenig, University of Wisconsin-Madison

This is a NISE Network product: 

no

Size: 

These gold nanoshells are each about 120 nm in diameter.

Pixels: Width: 

2998

Pixels: Height: 

2398

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Blue Morpho Butterfly Wing (reflected light)

Blue Morpho Butterfly Wing (reflected light)
The colors of the Blue Morpho's wing are generated by nanometer-sized structures on the wing's scales. In this image, light reflected from the scales creates the Morpho's characteristic iridescent blue color. The Blue Morpho is common in Central and South America and known for its bright blue wings. However, these iridescent colors are created not by pigments in the wing tissues but instead by the way light interacts with nanometer-sized structures on the Morpho's wing scales. This effect is being studied as a model in the development of new fabrics, dye-free paints, and anti-counterfeit technologies for currency.

Minimum credit: 

F. Nijhout, Duke University

Size: 

Each scale is about 70x200 µm.

Pixels: Width: 

2080

Pixels: Height: 

1542

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Blue Morpho Butterfly Wing (non-reflected light)

Blue Morpho Butterfly Wing (non-reflected light)
The colors of the Blue Morpho's wing are generated by nanometer-sized structures on the wing's scales. In this image, only the light passing through the wing is seen, revealing the wing's pigment-produced brown hue. The Blue Morpho is common in Central and South America and known for its bright blue wings. However, these iridescent colors are created not by pigments in the wing tissues but instead by the way light interacts with nanometer-sized structures on the Morpho's wing scales. This effect is being studied as a model in the development of new fabrics, dye-free paints, and anti-counterfeit technologies for currency.

Minimum credit: 

F. Nijhout, Duke University

Size: 

Each scale is about 70x200 µm.

Pixels: Width: 

2080

Pixels: Height: 

1542

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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