Tool: Optical Camera

Organic Light-Emitting Diode

Organic Light-Emitting Diode
This is a photograph of an organic light-emitting diode (OLED). OLEDs are being used in the newest generation of television screens. An OLED is comprised of a thin organic film held between conductors. When electrical current is applied to the conductors, the film emits a bright light. Because OLEDs emit light, OLED-based displays do not require backlighting. That's why these displays are both thinner and more efficient than today’s common LCD screens, which require an additional internal light source. Several major electronics companies have recently introduced OLED-based television screens.

Minimum credit: 

Raquell Ovilla, University of Texas at Dallas

Size: 

These organic films are about 200 nm thick.

Pixels: Width: 

405

Pixels: Height: 

423

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Blue Morpho Butterfly

Blue Morpho Butterfly
The iridescent colors of the Blue Morpho Butterfly's wings are produced by nanostructures that reflect different wavelengths of light. The Blue Morpho is common in Central and South America and known for its bright blue wings. However, these iridescent colors are created not by pigments in the wing tissues but instead by the way light interacts with nanometer-sized structures on the Morpho's wing scales. This effect is being studied as a model in the development of new fabrics, dye-free paints, and anti-counterfeit technologies for currency.

Minimum credit: 

Wikimedia Commons

Size: 

The wing span of a Blue Morpho Butterfly is about 10-15 cm.

Pixels: Width: 

1396

Pixels: Height: 

940

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Gecko Foot

Gecko Foot
The gecko's amazing ability to cling to vertical or inverted surfaces is due to the interaction between nanoscale structures on its feet and tiny crevices on the wall or ceiling. The soles of gecko feet are made up of overlapping adhesive lamellae covered with millions of superfine hairs, or setae, each of which branches out at the end into hundreds of spatula-shaped structures. These flexible pads—each measuring only a few nanometers across—curve to fit inside unseen cracks and divots on the surface. The combined adhesion of these millions of pads holds the gecko in place. This striking property is being studied for use in the creation of new kinds of adhesive tapes, self-dissolving bandages, and high friction materials that can support loads on smooth surfaces.

Minimum credit: 

A.Dhinojwala, University of Akron

Pixels: Width: 

574

Pixels: Height: 

574

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Nasturtium Leaf

Nasturtium Leaf
The Lotus Effect describes water droplets rolling off leaf surfaces, removing dirt and contaminants in the process. This phenomenon can also be seen in the more common nasturtium. Scanning electron microscope images show that nasturtium leaves are covered by waxy nanocrystal bundles. The uneven surface created by these tiny structures traps air between water and leaf, causing the water to roll off. Research on such nanoscale effects has inspired revolutionary new materials, including water- and stain-resistant fabrics.

Minimum credit: 

Amy Snyder, Exploratorium

Size: 

The size of each leaf is about 6-10 cm.

Pixels: Width: 

1974

Pixels: Height: 

1698

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

Return to gallery