Other Materials

Indium Arsenide Nanowire Field-Effect Transistor

Indium Arsenide Nanowire Field-Effect Transistor
This scanning electron microscope image shows an indium arsenide (InAs) nanowire field-effect transistor. Semiconductor nanowires such as those of indium arsenide (InAs) offer exciting possibilities for the electronic systems of the future because of the unique possibilities they offer for controlling fundamental properties during generation. A wide range of nanowire-based devices and systems, including transistors, circuits, light emitters, and sensors, have already been explored. Nanowire field-effect transistors have been of particular interest as vehicles for the investigation of basic carrier-transport behavior and as the heart of new generations of high-performance electronic devices.

Minimum credit: 

Shadi Dayeh, University of California at San Diego

Size: 

The nanowire at center is about 5 µm long.

Pixels: Width: 

645

Pixels: Height: 

430

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Indium Arsenide Nanowires

Indium Arsenide Nanowires
This is scanning electron microscope image of indium arsenide nanowires. Semiconductor nanowires such as those of indium arsenide (InAs) offer exciting possibilities for the electronic systems of the future because of the unique possibilities they offer for controlling fundamental properties during generation. A wide range of nanowire-based devices and systems, including transistors, circuits, light emitters, and sensors, have already been explored. Nanowire field-effect transistors have been of particular interest as vehicles for the investigation of basic carrier-transport behavior and as the heart of new generations of high-performance electronic devices.

Minimum credit: 

Shadi Dayeh, University of California at San Diego

Size: 

The width of the sample imaged is about 10 µm.

Pixels: Width: 

645

Pixels: Height: 

433

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Electrospun Scaffold

Electrospun Scaffold
This scanning electron microscope image shows an electrospun scaffold grown for studying brain tissue engineering and nerve regeneration. Scaffolds are of great interest in tissue engineering and nerve regeneration because they form a framework on which soft tissue is supported and thereby start its regeneration process. Electrospinning is a versatile process that creates nanofibers by applying a high voltage to electrically charge a liquid. Researchers can tailor a scaffold to meet the requirements of the tissue they seek to regenerate.

Minimum credit: 

David Nisbet, Monash University

Size: 

The image displayed is about 70 µm wide.

Pixels: Width: 

978

Pixels: Height: 

688

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Zinc Oxide Nanowires

Zinc Oxide Nanowires
This is a scanning electron microscope image of vertical arrays of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires on a sapphire substrate. Zinc oxide (ZnO) is an ideal material for nanoscale optoelectronics, electronics, and biotechnology applications. Numerous ZnO-based devices have already been developed, including nanowire field effect transistors, piezoelectric nanogenerators, optically pumped nanolasers, and biosensors.

Minimum credit: 

Shadi Dayeh, University of California at San Diego

Size: 

The sample displayed in the image is about 10 µm wide.

Pixels: Width: 

1102

Pixels: Height: 

965

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Hydrogel Scaffold

Hydrogel Scaffold
This scanning electron microscope image shows a hydrogel scaffold grown for studying brain tissue engineering and nerve regeneration. Hydrogels are polymers of great interest to researchers studying tissue engineering and nerve regeneration because they are compatible with a range of biological tissues and processes, they have mechanical properties similar to those of soft tissues, and they can be injected into tissues in liquid form. In addition, they allow living cells to assemble spontaneously on the scaffold structure.

Minimum credit: 

David Nisbet, Monash University

Size: 

The image is 100 µm wide.

Pixels: Width: 

980

Pixels: Height: 

685

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Zinc Oxide Nanowire Photodetector

Zinc Oxide Nanowire Photodetector
This scanning electron microscope image shows a zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowire photodetector device grown by photolithography. Nanowires geometry and structure make them both sensitive to light and efficient low-noise signaling devices, so they are ideally suited for applications involving light—such as detection, imaging, information storage, and intrachip optical communications. In addition, different types of nanowires can be combined to create devices sensitive to different wavelengths of light. Zinc oxide's (ZnO) electrical, optoelectronic, and photochemical properties have led to its use in solar cells, transparent electrodes, and blue/UV light-emitting devices.

Minimum credit: 

Cesare Soci, University of California at San Diego

Size: 

The separation between the "fingers" is 2 µm.

Pixels: Width: 

645

Pixels: Height: 

484

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Nanowire Photodetector

Nanowire Photodetector
This scanning electron micrograph shows a gallium nitride nanowire photodetector device with a zinc oxide core grown by e-beam lithography. The geometry and structure of nanowires make them both sensitive to light and efficient low-noise signaling devices, so they are ideally suited for applications involving light—such as detection, imaging, information storage, and intrachip optical communications. In addition, different types of nanowires can be combined to create devices sensitive to different wavelengths of light.

Minimum credit: 

Dr. Xinyu Bao, University of California at San Diego

This is a NISE Network product: 

no

Size: 

The nanowire has a diameter of about 200 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

646

Pixels: Height: 

484

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Organic Light-Emitting Diode

Organic Light-Emitting Diode
This is a photograph of an organic light-emitting diode (OLED). OLEDs are being used in the newest generation of television screens. An OLED is comprised of a thin organic film held between conductors. When electrical current is applied to the conductors, the film emits a bright light. Because OLEDs emit light, OLED-based displays do not require backlighting. That's why these displays are both thinner and more efficient than today’s common LCD screens, which require an additional internal light source. Several major electronics companies have recently introduced OLED-based television screens.

Minimum credit: 

Raquell Ovilla, University of Texas at Dallas

Size: 

These organic films are about 200 nm thick.

Pixels: Width: 

405

Pixels: Height: 

423

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Platinum Atoms

Platinum Atoms
Platinum atoms are arranged in closely packed hexagonal layers. A top view of this hexagonal structure is shown in this scanning tunneling microscope image. Platinum has applications in automotive engineering, chemical processing, jewelry, electronics, and wires and electrical contacts for use in corrosive or high-voltage environments. Platinum is also a component in magnetic coatings for high-density hard disc drives and new varieties of optical storage systems.

Minimum credit: 

Don Eigler, IBM Almaden Research Center

Size: 

The size of a platinum atom is around 0.3 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

1279

Pixels: Height: 

1024

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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Nickel Nanowires

Nickel Nanowires
The orientation of the nickel nanowires shown in this scanning electron microscope can be changed by altering the direction of an applied magnetic field. Nanowires are a key focus of nanotechnology research due to their potential uses in nanoscale electronic, magnetic, optical, and mechanical devices. Nickel nanowires in particular may play an important role in increasing the memory capacity of computer hard disc drives.

Minimum credit: 

Wendy Crone, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Size: 

The nanowires are 100-200 nm in diameter and about 20 µm in length.

Pixels: Width: 

588

Pixels: Height: 

389

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

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