Mechanical

Singlewalled Nanotube Paper

Singlewalled Nanotube Paper
A bundle of singlewalled nanotubes processed into a thin sheet is shown in this scanning electron microscope image. Singlewalled nanotubes are extremely important in the continuing miniaturization of electronic devices. These tubes have an average diameter of 1-2 nm. Their electrical properties have led to their investigation as super capacitors for storing electrical charges.

Minimum credit: 

Mei Zhang, University of Texas at Dallas

Size: 

The thickness of the sheet is about 50 µm.

Pixels: Width: 

1024

Pixels: Height: 

768

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

Return to gallery

Nanomechanical Antenna Oscillator

Nanomechanical Antenna Oscillator
This scanning electron micrograph depicts a silicon crystal nanomachined into an antenna oscillator that can vibrate about 1.5 billion times per second. The antenna-type oscillator is a nanomachined single-crystal structure of silicon. Using this design, movements 1000 times smaller than nanometer scale are amplified into motion of the entire micron-sized structure. Operating at gigahertz speeds, the technology could help further miniaturize wireless communication devices like cell phones. This macroscopic nanomechanical oscillator consists of roughly 50 billion silicon atoms.

Minimum credit: 

Raj Mohanty, Boston University

Size: 

The central silicon beam is 10.7 µm long and 400 nm wide; the "paddles" along the sides are 500 nm long and 200 nm wide.

Pixels: Width: 

1200

Pixels: Height: 

800

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

Return to gallery

Nanoscale Interface for Spin Injection

Nanoscale Interface for Spin Injection
This is a scanning electron micrograph of a nanoscale interface for spin injection in a nanomechanical torsion oscillator used for measuring tiny amounts of torque. This interface is built on a silicon-based nanomechanical torsion oscillator, a device used to measure tiny amounts of torque. The device contains a central wire running from top left to bottom right. The top surface of one part of this wire is coated with a 50 nm layer of cobalt (which is magnetic); the top surface of the other part is coated with 50 nm of non-magnetic gold. As electrons travel from the magnetic into the non-magnetic part of the nanowire, they flip their spin directions, causing mechanical twisting of the wire.

Minimum credit: 

Raj Mohanty, Boston University

Size: 

The diameter of the nanowire at center is about 100 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

585

Pixels: Height: 

483

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

Return to gallery

Spin Torsion Oscillator

Spin Torsion Oscillator
This scanning electron micrograph shows a nanomechanical torsion oscillator used by computer engineers to measure extremely small amounts of torque. A nanomechanical torsion oscillator is used to measure extremely small torsion or twisting forces smaller than those created by the untwisting of a strand of DNA. When current passes from magnetic into non-magnetic materials, the directional spins of the electrons flip at the boundary, producing a mechanical torque. This device can measure the torque in a metallic nanowire with unprecedented sensitivity. This approach to measuring torque has applications in spintronics as well as in fundamental physics, chemistry, and biology, and is particularly important in the hard disc industry.

Minimum credit: 

Raj Mohanty, Boston University

Size: 

The nanowire at the center of this image has a diameter of about 80 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

1800

Pixels: Height: 

975

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

Return to gallery

Nanotubes Mimicking Gecko Feet

Nanotubes Mimicking Gecko Feet
The nanoscale structures on a gecko's foot enable it to cling to most surfaces. This scanning electron microscope image shows multiwalled carbon nanotubes attached to a polymer backing, an experiment designed to replicate the gecko foot's adhesive properties. The gecko's amazing ability to cling to vertical or inverted surfaces is due to the interaction between nanoscale structures on its feet and tiny crevices on the wall or ceiling. The soles of gecko feet are made up of overlapping adhesive lamellae covered with millions of superfine hairs, or setae, each of which branches out at the end into hundreds of spatula-shaped structures. These flexible pads—each measuring only a few nanometers across—curve to fit inside unseen cracks and divots on the surface. The combined adhesion of these millions of pads holds the gecko in place.

Minimum credit: 

Ali Dhinojwala, University of Akron

This is a NISE Network product: 

no

Size: 

Each bundle of carbon nanotubes measures about 70-80 µm in width.

Pixels: Width: 

1181

Pixels: Height: 

1181

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

Return to gallery

Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Forest

Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Forest
This scanning electron microscope image shows a wall of carbon nanotubes. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes are nested within each other. They exhibit extraordinary strength and unique electrical properties. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes are actually tubes nested within tubes. These cylindrical carbon molecules have extraordinary strength and important electrical properties, making them potentially useful for many applications in electronics, optics, and other areas of materials science, as well as architectural fields.

This is a NISE Network product: 

no

Size: 

The diameter of a nanotube is around 10 nm.

Pixels: Width: 

1024

Pixels: Height: 

768

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

Return to gallery

Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Yarn

Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Yarn
Nanoscale fibers drawn from multiwalled carbon nanotubes have strengths comparable to spider silk. Replacing metal wires in electronic textiles with these super-strong yarns could lead to important new functionalities, such as the ability to actuate (as an artificial muscle) and to store energy (as a fiber super-capacitor or battery).

Minimum credit: 

Mei Zhang, University of Texas at Dallas

Size: 

The yarn's diameter is about 1 µm. The nanotubes from which it is being drawn are each about 10 nm in diameter.

Pixels: Width: 

1022

Pixels: Height: 

718

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

Return to gallery

Gecko Foot (8700X)

Gecko Foot (8700X)
The gecko's amazing ability to cling to vertical or inverted surfaces is due to the interaction between nanoscale structures on its feet and tiny crevices on the wall or ceiling. The soles of gecko feet are made up of overlapping adhesive lamellae covered with millions of superfine hairs, or setae, each of which branches out at the end into hundreds of spatula-shaped structures. These flexible pads—each measuring only a few nanometers across—curve to fit inside unseen cracks and divots on the surface. The combined adhesion of these millions of pads holds the gecko in place. This striking property is being studied for use in the creation of new kinds of adhesive tapes, self-dissolving bandages, and high friction materials that can support loads on smooth surfaces.

Minimum credit: 

Cliff Mathisen, FEI Company

Pixels: Width: 

493

Pixels: Height: 

522

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

Return to gallery

Gecko Foot (1660X)

Gecko Foot (1660X)
The gecko's amazing ability to cling to vertical or inverted surfaces is due to the interaction between nanoscale structures on its feet and tiny crevices on the wall or ceiling. The soles of gecko feet are made up of overlapping adhesive lamellae covered with millions of superfine hairs, or setae, each of which branches out at the end into hundreds of spatula-shaped structures. These flexible pads—each measuring only a few nanometers across—curve to fit inside unseen cracks and divots on the surface. The combined adhesion of these millions of pads holds the gecko in place. This striking property is being studied for use in the creation of new kinds of adhesive tapes, self-dissolving bandages, and high friction materials that can support loads on smooth surfaces.

Minimum credit: 

Cliff Mathisen, FEI Company

Pixels: Width: 

379

Pixels: Height: 

401

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

Return to gallery

Gecko Toe

Gecko Toe
The gecko's amazing ability to cling to vertical or inverted surfaces is due to the interaction between nanoscale structures on its feet and tiny crevices on the wall or ceiling. The soles of gecko feet are made up of overlapping adhesive lamellae covered with millions of superfine hairs, or setae, each of which branches out at the end into hundreds of spatula-shaped structures. These flexible pads—each measuring only a few nanometers across—curve to fit inside unseen cracks and divots on the surface. The combined adhesion of these millions of pads holds the gecko in place. This striking property is being studied for use in the creation of new kinds of adhesive tapes, self-dissolving bandages, and high friction materials that can support loads on smooth surfaces.

Minimum credit: 

Cliff Mathisen, FEI Company

Pixels: Width: 

1024

Pixels: Height: 

1084

Permissions:

This image was created by another institution, not the NISE Network. This image is available to NISE Network member organizations for non-profit educational use only. Uses may include but are not limited to reproduction and distribution of copies, creation of derivative works, and combination with other assets to create exhibitions, programs, publications, research, and Web sites. Minimum credit required.

Return to gallery