AFM

NanoLab

Nanolab is an immersive exhibit space, with activities and interactive components suitable for visitors of all ages. NanoLab explores how nanoscientists use special devices and laboratories to build and manipulate materials on the nanoscale. Visitors can dress up like a scientist, play with interactive exhibits, examine clothing and objects used in real labs, watch a video on nanoscale research, and explore the resource area for materials on nanotechnology and the basics of nanoscale science.

CDs and DVDs as Diffraction Gratings (High School curriculum lesson)

The objective of this lab is to campare the diffraction behavior of light waves between a CD and DVD. CDs and DVDs contain regularly spaced micrometer sized features which can act like a diffraction grating. Using commercial electronic storage devices like CDs and DVDs as gratings rather than commercially produced plan transmission gratings enhances student interest in the activity and also opens up a discussion on the trend of improving storage capacity with the invention of Blu-ray and layered DVDs.

NanoFabulous

NanoFabulous, an exhibition developed by the University of Maryland, College Park Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) is on display at Port Discovery Children’s Museum in Baltimore, MD. The exhibit is designed to help children and their families understand how scientists and engineers discover and invent new materials from nanoscale building-blocks.

Zoom into a Pencil Line of Graphene with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) - Illustration

This illustration shows how an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is used to image a line of graphene made by a pencil. The scale spans ten orders of magnitude, from the microscope and pencil to the atoms that compose the scanning probe and pencil line. As the viewer zooms into the line, graphite flakes, and eventually a single layer of graphene, become visible. On the AFM, a silicon cantilever with a sharp atomic tip and a laser with a photodiode measure the up and down motion as the probe maps out the graphene sample.

DIY Nano

These 'Do It Yourself' Nano activities and experiments allow families to experience and learn about nanoscale science, engineering, and technology at home or on the go! They are are designed to be done in the comfort of your own home. Each activity includes lists of widely available, inexpensive materials, step-by-step instructions, and detailed explanations. Go ahead, give 'em a try!

Virtual Lab - Remote Access to Instrumentation

The NACK center at Penn State University has set up a remote access to the Instrumentation available in their labs for educators to use in class. This is available free of cost to educators. Traditionally, an engineer from Penn State University orchestrates the instrument's use, while offering additional assistance via audio and visual internet software. However if you are familiar with the equipment (AFM, SEM , UV-Vis) you can control it from your location using your computer, internet connection and Skype.

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