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NSTA online workshop: Knowing Nano

This Web Seminar, developed in collaboration with the National Science Digital Library, took place on Wednesday, November 11, 2009 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern time. Dr. Lisa Regalla, Science Editor for DragonflyTV provided participants with a greater understanding of nanoscale science by giving a brief history of how our understanding of nanotechnology has rapidly grown over time. Dr. Regalla cited several examples of nano-level phenomena found in nature that scientists have studied.

European Union - Nanotechnologies: Principles, Applications, Implications and Hands-on Activities A compendium for educators

This compendium aims to address this challenge: as a matter of fact, it stems from the EC project NANOYOU, and it has been enriched by the authors with numerous and multifaceted inputs, reflections and insights on societal issues, also provided by the European project TimeforNano. So it represents a valuable tool to support the educational communities on nanosciences and nanotechnologies.

Modeling Self-Assembly (High School curriculum lesson)

There are two activities in this lesson, the Fly Prison and the Water Maze. The Fly Prison is a hands-on modeling activity designed to introduce students to the area of nanotechnology and give them a basic understanding of how researchers build very small devices by the self-assembly of molecules. The water maze is a follow-up activity to give the students a chance to practice and demonstrate what they have learned.

Modeling Self Assembly (Middle School curriculum lesson)

There are two activities in this lesson, the Fly Prison and the Water Maze. The fly Prison is a hands-on modeling activity designed to introduce students to the area of nanotechnology and give them a basic understanding of how researchers build very small devices by the self-assembly of molecules. The water maze is a follow-up activity to give the students a chance to practice and demonstrate what they have learned.

The Water Race: Hydrophobic & Hydrophilic Surfaces (High School curriculum lesson)

Nonpolar molecules that repel the water molecules are said to be hydrophobic; molecules forming ionic or a hydrogen bond with the water molecule are said to be hydrophilic. This property of water was important for the evolution of life. Hydrophobic interaction plays the most critical roles in the formation of the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane and the folding of proteins and nucleic acids; therefore, hydrophobic interaction is the foundation for the existence of life.

Exploring Nanotechnology through Consumer Products (Middle and High School curriculum lesson)

After an introductory PowerPoint on nanotechnology students are given a chance in groups to explore consumer products through an information sheet provided over available consumer products. After learning about products students can create a presentation for a particular product; test their product; or research a career in nanotechnology.

Reading and Analyzing Nanotechnology (Middle and High School curriculum lesson)

A focus of the National Science Standards is that students are provided opportunities to read and analyze science outside of their textbooks. This lesson will allow reading across the curriculum by providing students the opportunity to read about nanotechnology. In addition this will open up an opportunity to engage students in discourse about a significant technology that will allow them to analyze and reflect on its implications and significance for the future.

Surface Area to Volume Ratio (Middle and High School curriculum lesson)

This lab is designed to help students understand how nanoparticles may be more effective catalysts by investigating how the surface area-to-volume ratio of a substance is affected as its shape changes. This lab is meant to complement a chemistry unit on catalysts. Nanosized materials have a significant portion of their atoms on the surface. Understanding how catalysts work involves studying chemical reactions at the molecular and atomic scale. For this reason, catalysis can be considered one of the earliest forms of nanoscale science.

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